Author Topic: combat icon help  (Read 3020 times)

Offline Nol Drek

  • Dungeon Craft Tester
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2183
    • Nol Drek's Web Site
Re: combat icon help
« Reply #15 on: December 12, 2009, 12:13:28 PM »
I have used the same method that I used on this giant ghoul here on some other icons (changing the hue, then running the image through the UA256 program), and sometimes it worked, sometimes it didn't. My slightly reworked gnolls look pretty good, for example.

The way it works with portraits and bigpics, UA256 automatically sets the colors to ones that will work in UA, and my pics almost never lose quality in the process.
In fact, most of them look identical to their "untreated" templates.

UA256 is a program which adjusts the palette of an image to work with the UA palette for small pics and big pics. Small pics and big pics can use 224 colors, and the key thing is that each small pic and each big pic has its OWN palette. One small pic can have 224 shades of brown, and the next can be bright yellow and purple, because each image loads its own set of 224 colors to use.

UA256 will NOT work with combat icons, because combat icons need to share a palette. The palette is loaded with the dungeon combat art. All monsters icons, player character icons, NPC icons, and spell efect icons need to be displayed with the same background, so they all use need to use the same palette.

Rather than running an icon through UA256 (which will not work for reasons stated above), what I do is:
1) Open one of UA's default icons in my favorite paint program.
2) Save the palette as "combat.pal".
3) Open the icon I am creating and reduce the color depth to 256 if necessary.
4) Load the "combat.pal" palette and select "nearest color matching".

The result will not be 100% faithful to the original image, but it will work in UA.
"Into the Drachensgrab Mountains!"

http://www.noldrek.com

Offline Ben J

  • Keeper of the 44 quest variables
  • Dungeon Craft Tester
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2723
  • "See how I reward those who fail me!"
Re: combat icon help
« Reply #16 on: December 12, 2009, 01:25:41 PM »
UA256 is a program which adjusts the palette of an image to work with the UA palette for small pics and big pics. Small pics and big pics can use 224 colors, and the key thing is that each small pic and each big pic has its OWN palette. One small pic can have 224 shades of brown, and the next can be bright yellow and purple, because each image loads its own set of 224 colors to use.

Okay, that's exactly the difference between smallpics and combat icons that I didn't understand.

But I think I get it now.  :D

Quote
Rather than running an icon through UA256 (which will not work for reasons stated above), what I do is:
1) Open one of UA's default icons in my favorite paint program.
2) Save the palette as "combat.pal".
3) Open the icon I am creating and reduce the color depth to 256 if necessary.
4) Load the "combat.pal" palette and select "nearest color matching".

Which paint program has this function ("nearest color matching")? Because mine doesn't have that. If I'm loading a palette, all I can select is which way the image should handle the dithering.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2009, 01:29:07 PM by Ben J »
Released designs:

The Sect

Offline hans

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2721
Re: combat icon help
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2009, 08:50:12 PM »
There are two demos of old versions of PaintShop Pro at the UA File Archive that would do this. 

I use PSP 3.something, myself, and it includes that command.

Offline nologgie

  • Non-resident Non-expert
  • Dungeon Craft Tester
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3465
Re: combat icon help
« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2009, 09:14:35 AM »
  For recoloring icons I like to use Deluxe Paint 2e, from back in the days before hard drives or windows OS. It has a fuction for copying the foreground color to the background color in either a picture or a user-defined brush. Since the background color is displayed in a square which surrounds a smaller square containing the foreground color, finding the closest match in a fixed palette is largely a matter of clicking through the possible colors.
  It also supports color cycling and multi-cycling.
Some days it just doesn't pay to gnaw through the straps.